Tag: research

Researcher finds men strip for self-esteem boost

The study by Maren Scull, an instructor of Sociology in the CU Denver College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, was published online this month in Deviant Behavior, the only scientific journal that specifically addresses behaviors that violate social norms. Scull’s research focuses on how exotic dancing influences the way male strippers view themselves. “Because stripping [...]

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At midyear, Colorado poised for continued growth in 2015, says CU Leeds School

The Colorado economy continues to expand, outperforming the U.S. economy and reaffirming previous expectations, according to the midyear economic update released today by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. “Right now we’re very, very close to our forecast released in December,” said economist Richard Wobbekind, executive director of the Business Research Division, [...]

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Five questions for Mitchell Handelsman

Handelsman

A CU Denver psychology professor, his college experiences with mentors not only pushed him toward the study of psychology, but also prompted him to “pay forward” the courtesies.

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Business confidence down but positive for third quarter, says CU-Boulder index

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The confidence of Colorado business leaders dipped slightly though remained optimistic going into the third quarter of 2015, according to the Leeds Business Confidence Index released July 1 by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. The fall to an overall reading of 58.3, down from 61.7 going into the second quarter of [...]

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Five questions for Maria Caffrey

Maria Caffrey

The CU-Boulder research associate has studied climate change in places as far away as Guatemala and as close as Rocky Mountain National Park. Since 2013, her research has focused on climate change at 118 coastal National Parks, looking at impacts of seal level and storm surge.

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Study: No evidence of negative impacts to children of same-sex couples

Study: No evidence of negative impacts to children of same-sex couples

A new study from the University of Colorado Denver finds that scientists agree that children of same-sex parents experience “no difference” on a range of social and behavioral outcomes compared to children of heterosexual or single parents. The study was le​d by Jimi Adams, an associate professor in the Department of Health and Behavioral Studies [...]

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Fiez named vice chancellor for research at CU-Boulder

Terri Fiez, director of strategic initiatives and professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Oregon State University, has been named vice chancellor for research at CU-Boulder. Fiez (pronounced fees) will begin her duties on Sept 16. A former National Science Foundation Young Investigator awardee with more than 150 publications, Fiez’s scholarly [...]

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Five CU researchers named Boettcher Investigators for 2015

Five CU researchers named Boettcher Investigators for 2015

The innovative program in the Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Awards encourages the “best and brightest” in Colorado bioscience and supports significant research to advance knowledge and positively affect human health.

With website, CU-Boulder opens up access to scholarly research

With website, CU-Boulder opens up access to scholarly research

Two of the most downloaded research papers from CU Scholar discuss promoting sustainability at music events and the long-run impact of immigrants on native workers. Those and hundreds of others are available for viewing since the campus adopted its open access policy.

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Stricter limits for ozone pollution would boost need for science, measurements

Stricter limits for ozone pollution

A tougher federal standard for ozone pollution, under consideration to improve public health, would ramp up the importance of scientific measurements and models, according to a new commentary published in the June 5 edition of Science by researchers at NOAA and its cooperative institute at the University of Colorado Boulder. The commentary, led by Owen [...]

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Five questions for Michelle Cardel

Cardel

A postdoctoral fellow and pediatric obesity expert at the CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center, she studies how social factors influence eating behavior.

Krizek named first cycling professor

Kevin J. Krizek, professor of Transport in the Programs of Environmental Design and Environment Studies at CU-Boulder, has been appointed as the visiting professor of “Cycling in Changing Urban Regions” at Radboud University in the Netherlands. The Netherlands is reputed for its cycling culture and Krizek will offer his expertise and an outside perspective on [...]

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Finding a new strategy for Parkinson’s disease

Finding a new strategy for Parkinson’s disease

If you believe the adage that you’re only using 10 percent of your brain, you’re about to be surprised. BioFrontiers Institute’s Hang Hubert Yin, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, is eager to tap into that other 90 percent of our nervous system we’ve been wondering about.

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School of Medicine research: Medicaid patients prefer ER

More than half of all Medicaid enrollees prefer the “one-stop shop” of a hospital emergency department to receive care for conditions that could be treated effectively at a primary care clinic, according to an article by a researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus. The finding exposes a [...]

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Five questions for Spero Manson

Manson

A Distinguished Professor of public health and psychiatry, he leads the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health at the Colorado School of Public Health.

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Researchers create microscope allowing deep brain exploration

A team of neuroscientists and bioengineers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have created a miniature, fiber-optic microscope designed to peer deeply inside a living brain. The researchers, including scientists from the University of Colorado Boulder, published details of their revolutionary microscope in the latest issue of `Optics Letters’ journal. “Microscopes today penetrate [...]

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Five questions for Alexander Soifer

Soifer

When asked to explain how he chose to immerse himself in the fields of mathematics, art and film history, the UCCS professor easily answers: “I am a student of Beauty in all her manifestations.”

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New clinic aims to smooth bumpy road of cancer treatment

Cancer has been called many things, but “predictable” is not one of them. The elusive disease affects nearly every part of the body, arises from a variety of causes, and is capable of cellular mutations that frustrate providers battling it. Similarly, there is no easy way to pin down the effects that cancer treatments may [...]

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Five questions for Ken Schroeppel

Schroeppel

The CU Denver instructor of planning and design is involved in this weekend’s Doors Open Denver.

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Researchers produce first atlas of airborne microbes across United States

Researchers produce first atlas of airborne microbes

A University of Colorado Boulder and North Carolina State University-led team has produced the first atlas of airborne microbes across the continental U.S., a feat that has implications for better understanding health and disease in humans, animals and crops.

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New technique could slash energy used to produce many plastics

New technique could slash energy used to produce many plastics

A new material developed at the University of Colorado Boulder could radically reduce the energy needed to produce a wide variety of plastic products, from grocery bags and cling wrap to replacement hips and bulletproof vests. Approximately 80 million metric tons of polyethylene is produced globally each year, making it the most common plastic in [...]

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CU Anschutz researchers leading the way in telehealth

Researchers from the Barbara Davis Center at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have launched a major clinical study using telehealth to target youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) with the help of over $1 million in gifts, including $960,000 from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. The focus is on [...]

CU researchers: Brain activity boosts processes that promote neural connections

CU researchers: Brain activity boosts processes that promote neural connections

Brain activity affects the way the developing brain connects neurons and a study by researchers at the School of Medicine on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children’s Hospital Colorado suggests a new model for understanding that process. In a study of zebrafish, scientists tested how brain activity affected the development of insulating [...]

Faculty, students revved up about Large Hadron Collider restart

Faculty, students revved up about Large Hadron Collider restart

University of Colorado Boulder faculty and students are primed to get back in action following the Easter restart of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s most powerful atom smasher located near Geneva, Switzerland, after a two-year hiatus. Following intensive upgrades and repairs, proton beams from the LHC once again began flying around a 17-mile [...]

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Facebook app encourages people to get in touch with their DNA

Facebook app encourages people to get in touch with their DNA

Have you ever wondered if your dad’s fight with prostate cancer means you could face the same reality? Or perhaps your family has several members who have struggled with obesity and you wonder if it’s something you inherited or if it’s caused by the environment. Good news: researchers at the University of Michigan School of [...]

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Study: Ending statin use might improve quality of life for some patients

Study: Ending statin use might improve quality of life for some patients

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients’ quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [...]

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Study: Western forests decimated by pine beetles not more likely to burn

Study: Western forests decimated by pine beetles not more likely to burn

Western U.S. forests killed by the mountain pine beetle epidemic are no more at risk to burn than healthy Western forests, according to new findings by the University of Colorado Boulder that fly in the face of public perception and policy. The CU-Boulder study authors looked at the three peak years of Western wildfires since [...]

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Davies, Melbourne team for study on forest land

Kendi Davies and Brett Melbourne, assistant professors in CU-Boulder’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, are co-authors of a global study that found that 70 percent of forested lands remaining in the world are within a half-mile of the forest edge, where encroaching urban, suburban or agricultural influences can cause any number of harmful effects. [...]

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Research on small cellular changes may lead to big cancer solutions

Research on small cellular changes may lead to big cancer solutions

Researchers at CU-Boulder’s BioFrontiers and the CU Cancer Center at CU Anschutz are teaming to study bladder cancer cell lines and look for cellular similarities, which might lead to a single cure for many cancers.

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Study: ‘Advertainment’ on the rise in pop music

Study: ‘Advertainment’ on the rise in pop music

As branding and advertising creep into almost every facet of life, a new study from the University of Colorado Denver shows it’s now making substantial inroads into popular music. The study examined in detail the yearly top 30 Billboard songs from 1960 to 2013 – a total of 1,583 – and found a steep increase [...]

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