Tag: research

Five questions for Ken Schroeppel

Schroeppel

The CU Denver instructor of planning and design is involved in this weekend’s Doors Open Denver.

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Researchers produce first atlas of airborne microbes across United States

Researchers produce first atlas of airborne microbes

A University of Colorado Boulder and North Carolina State University-led team has produced the first atlas of airborne microbes across the continental U.S., a feat that has implications for better understanding health and disease in humans, animals and crops.

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New technique could slash energy used to produce many plastics

New technique could slash energy used to produce many plastics

A new material developed at the University of Colorado Boulder could radically reduce the energy needed to produce a wide variety of plastic products, from grocery bags and cling wrap to replacement hips and bulletproof vests. Approximately 80 million metric tons of polyethylene is produced globally each year, making it the most common plastic in [...]

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CU Anschutz researchers leading the way in telehealth

Researchers from the Barbara Davis Center at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have launched a major clinical study using telehealth to target youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) with the help of over $1 million in gifts, including $960,000 from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. The focus is on [...]

CU researchers: Brain activity boosts processes that promote neural connections

CU researchers: Brain activity boosts processes that promote neural connections

Brain activity affects the way the developing brain connects neurons and a study by researchers at the School of Medicine on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Children’s Hospital Colorado suggests a new model for understanding that process. In a study of zebrafish, scientists tested how brain activity affected the development of insulating [...]

Faculty, students revved up about Large Hadron Collider restart

Faculty, students revved up about Large Hadron Collider restart

University of Colorado Boulder faculty and students are primed to get back in action following the Easter restart of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s most powerful atom smasher located near Geneva, Switzerland, after a two-year hiatus. Following intensive upgrades and repairs, proton beams from the LHC once again began flying around a 17-mile [...]

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Facebook app encourages people to get in touch with their DNA

Facebook app encourages people to get in touch with their DNA

Have you ever wondered if your dad’s fight with prostate cancer means you could face the same reality? Or perhaps your family has several members who have struggled with obesity and you wonder if it’s something you inherited or if it’s caused by the environment. Good news: researchers at the University of Michigan School of [...]

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Study: Ending statin use might improve quality of life for some patients

Study: Ending statin use might improve quality of life for some patients

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients’ quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [...]

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Study: Western forests decimated by pine beetles not more likely to burn

Study: Western forests decimated by pine beetles not more likely to burn

Western U.S. forests killed by the mountain pine beetle epidemic are no more at risk to burn than healthy Western forests, according to new findings by the University of Colorado Boulder that fly in the face of public perception and policy. The CU-Boulder study authors looked at the three peak years of Western wildfires since [...]

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Davies, Melbourne team for study on forest land

Kendi Davies and Brett Melbourne, assistant professors in CU-Boulder’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, are co-authors of a global study that found that 70 percent of forested lands remaining in the world are within a half-mile of the forest edge, where encroaching urban, suburban or agricultural influences can cause any number of harmful effects. [...]

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Research on small cellular changes may lead to big cancer solutions

Research on small cellular changes may lead to big cancer solutions

Researchers at CU-Boulder’s BioFrontiers and the CU Cancer Center at CU Anschutz are teaming to study bladder cancer cell lines and look for cellular similarities, which might lead to a single cure for many cancers.

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Study: ‘Advertainment’ on the rise in pop music

Study: ‘Advertainment’ on the rise in pop music

As branding and advertising creep into almost every facet of life, a new study from the University of Colorado Denver shows it’s now making substantial inroads into popular music. The study examined in detail the yearly top 30 Billboard songs from 1960 to 2013 – a total of 1,583 – and found a steep increase [...]

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Postdoc Research Day is about meeting people, starting collaborations and getting feedback

Postdoc Research Day

Postdoctoral fellows are investigators who perform basic science research that finds its way into applications that help humankind in myriad ways — from civil engineering to environmental science to disease therapies. There are almost 300 postdocs at the University of Colorado Denver | Anschutz Medical Campus, and much of their research focuses on the intricacies [...]

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Eleven CU-Boulder faculty members honored with NSF CAREER Awards

Eleven University of Colorado Boulder researchers, including an unprecedented number of engineers, have received the National Science Foundation’s prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards. The recently announced winners include seven so far this year—all from the College of Engineering and Applied Science—and four from 2014. The research awards, which usually amount to about $500,000 [...]

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Five questions for Nia Mitchell

Mitchell

As a lifetime member of Weight Watchers, she understands the struggles her patients face and how challenging weight loss can be.

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Study: Pediatricians pressured to delay vaccinations

Study: Pediatricians pressured to delay vaccinations

Pediatricians are facing increasing pressure from some parents who want to spread out the recommended vaccine schedule for their children by postponing vaccines, pointing to a need for improved programs that support timely vaccinations, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. The [...]

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Researchers propose novel mechanism to explain region’s high elevation

Researchers propose novel mechanism to explain region’s high elevation

No one really knows how the High Plains got so high. About 70 million years ago, eastern Colorado, southeastern Wyoming, western Kansas and western Nebraska were near sea level. Since then, the region has risen about 2 kilometers, leading to some head scratching at geology conferences. Now researchers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in [...]

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Havlick a collaborator on Fort Carson research

David Havlick, associate professor, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, UCCS, and Eric Perramond, associate professor of environmental science and Southwest studies, Colorado College, spent more than seven years tracking the efforts of the U.S. military to expand the Army base at Fort Carson and the rural resistance against it. The pair wrote “Militarized spaces [...]

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CU-Boulder technology could make treatment and reuse of oil and gas wastewater simpler, cheaper

Oil and gas operations in the United States produce about 21 billion barrels of wastewater per year. The saltiness of the water and the organic contaminants it contains have traditionally made treatment difficult and expensive. Engineers at the University of Colorado Boulder have invented a simpler process that can simultaneously remove both salts and organic [...]

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CU Anschutz researcher examining impact of service dogs on returning vets

With scores of military veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, a University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus researcher is examining the therapeutic impacts of service dogs on their mental and physical health. “We are finding that service dogs are improving the health of our returning wounded warriors,” said Cheryl Krause-Parello, Ph.D., R.N. at the CU [...]

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Gover co-authors study of Colorado response to domestic violence

Angela Gover, a professor in the School of Public Affairs at CU Denver, and Tara N. Richards, assistant professor in the University of Baltimore’s School of Criminal Justice in the College of Public Affairs, have co-authored a research paper looking at Colorado’s responses to domestic violence. After a statewide process evaluation for the Domestic Violence [...]

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Koester researches effect of Denver’s camping ban on homeless

Stephen Koester, professor of anthropology and health and behavioral sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at CU Denver, recently co-authored several papers and presented findings on ethnographic fieldwork among Denver’s homeless population to examine how the city’s recently enacted camping ban affected people’s living arrangements and survival strategies. Koester collaborated with recent graduate of [...]

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Chemical warfare’s history casts dark shadow today

Chemical warfare’s history casts dark shadow today

The use of chemical warfare is the topic of a one-day symposium organized by Joseph Gal for the upcoming American Chemical Society’s National Meeting and Exposition in Denver. A professor of medicine and pathology at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, Gal’s specialties include historical aspects of science and medicine.

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CU-Boulder technology for thin electronics commercialized by Kelvin Thermal

CU-Boulder technology for thin electronics commercialized by Kelvin Thermal

Kelvin Thermal Technologies and the University of Colorado have executed an exclusive license agreement that will allow the company to develop and market thermal management technologies that could enable the development of ultra-thin and flexible smartphones, wearable electronics and other commercial and military systems. As computers, smartphones and other systems become more advanced and consume [...]

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Clauset study: Alma mater’s prestige highly predictive of faculty placement

Clauset

Aaron Clauset, assistant professor of computer science at CU-Boulder, was the lead author of a study that found that small differences in institutional prestige have an enormous impact on the likelihood that a person who graduates with a doctoral degree will land a coveted faculty job. The advantage of alma mater prestige in finding a [...]

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Thayer publishes on stress of racial discrimination during pregnancy

Zaneta Thayer, assistant professor of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at CU Denver, recently published two articles addressing effects of stress during pregnancy. One article, “Ethnic Discrimination Predicts Poor Self-rated Health and Cortisol in Pregnancy: Insights From New Zealand,” is in Social Science and Medicine. It looks at the relationship between a woman’s [...]

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Butler featured in video on how math models predict storms

Troy Butler, assistant professor in the Department of Mathematical and Statistical Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at CU Denver, is in a new video detailing how to improve the predictive capabilities of mathematical models that can help in severe storm forecasting. The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) produced the video featuring [...]

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Five questions for Rebecca Laroche

Five questions for Rebecca Laroche

While in graduate school, UCCS professor Rebecca Laroche became interested in women writers in literary history. As she focused on literature from the 16th and 17th centuries, she began researching women’s roles in medicine and found there were just as many women in medicine as men.

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Is there harm in sexting?

Sexting Panic: Rethinking Criminalization, Privacy, and Consent (Feminist Media Studies)

A new book released this week by CU Denver’s Amy Hasinoff examines the social conversations around sexting. In it, she discusses how teenage sexting – sending sexually explicit images or text messages over cell phones and social media – is thought about, talked about and regulated.

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$10 million grant to support pulmonary hypertension study

$10 million grant to support pulmonary hypertension study

A team of physicians and scientists led by a pulmonologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus has been awarded a $10.2 million, four-year federal grant to support a lung bank that will provide improved research opportunities into the causes and potential treatments for lung disease. Mark Geraci, [...]

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