Tag: research

Five questions for Gail Armstrong

Armstrong

On the College of Nursing faculty since 2000, she now is an associate professor who focuses on adult acute care nursing and quality and safety.

Written by Cynthia Pasquale • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

Study shows links between city design, health

Study shows links between city design, health

In a rare study of how street network design affects public health, researchers at the University of Colorado Denver and the University of Connecticut have discovered that older, more compact cities promote more walking and biking and are generally healthier than many newer communities. “Previously we had found that people drive less and walk more [...]

Written by David Kelly • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Five questions for Pam Laird

5q_front

Her studies focus on the history of American business cultures, and she’s written two books and is contemplating a third.

Written by Cynthia Pasquale • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

CU-Boulder study paved way for stocking state’s ‘true’ greenback cutthroat into wild

campus_boulder-homepage

A genetic sleuthing effort led by the University of Colorado Boulder that resulted in the identification of Colorado’s “true” native greenback cutthroat trout two years ago has come full circle with the stocking of the official state fish into Colorado’s high country. Roughly 1,200 greenback cutthroat fingerlings reared in federal and state hatcheries in Colorado [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Why I chose to teach here: Jared Brown and Zaneta Thayer

campus_denver_front

ZANETA THAYER: Room to teach and do research Zaneta Thayer, Ph.D., finished her doctoral degree in anthropology last fall with impeccable academic credentials. She was considering various options when she saw a faculty position posted in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Colorado Denver. Thayer earned bachelor’s degrees in biology and anthropology at [...]

Five questions for David Rood

Five questions for David Rood

A professor of linguistics at the University of Colorado Boulder, he studies language structures. Rood and fellow linguists aren’t so interested in “mastering the system” – or learning to speak the language – but in describing it. He’s been doing just that at CU since 1967.

Written by Cynthia Pasquale • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

New report highlights how climate change may affect water in Colorado

climate change may affect water in Colorado

“Despite some uncertainties around precipitation, it’s clear that as temperatures rise in Colorado, there will be impacts on our water resources,” said Jeff Lukas, lead author of the new report and a researcher at the Western Water Assessment, a program of the University of Colorado Boulder funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: , ,

Decoding ethnic labels: Are you Chicano, Latino or Hispanic?

Decoding ethnic labels: Are you Chicano, Latino or Hispanic?

If you are of Latin American descent, do you call yourself Chicano? Latino? Hispanic? As an undergraduate at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Carlos Hipolito-Delgado, Ph.D., knew instinctively that the ethnic labels his fellow students chose said something about their perception of themselves and their values. “There was a very clear understanding that [...]

Written by Vicki Hildner • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Drones 101: Course in Unmanned Aerial Systems looks to the future

Take a look at the current CU Denver catalog and you will see a course titled Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). Housed in the Geomatics Engineering and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Program of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, this course might, at first glance, look like Drones 101—the study of the unmanned aircraft often [...]

Written by Vicki Hildner • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

CU-Boulder-led team identifies fossils of tiny, unknown hedgehog

CU-Boulder-led team identifies fossils of tiny, unknown hedgehog

Meet perhaps the tiniest hedgehog species ever: Silvacola acares. Its roughly 52-million-year-old fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia. The hedgehog’s scientific name means “tiny forest dweller,” said CU-Boulder Associate Professor Jaelyn Eberle of the geological sciences department, lead author on the study. The creature — [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Kennedy named a Pew Scholar

Kennedy

Matthew J. Kennedy, assistant professor of pharmacology in the School of Medicine, has been named a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences. He is one of 22 early-career researchers to receive the honor this year from the Pew Charitable Trusts. The scholars will receive flexible funding to investigate some of the world’s most pressing problems [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

Denver philanthropist Frederic C. Hamilton donates $3 million to CU Anschutz

He committed his support for research and patient care with a multi-year, $3 million gift in May to support two major campus initiatives.

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: , ,

Study: More cyclists on road can mean fewer collisions

bike-safer

A University of Colorado Denver study examining collisions between bicycles and motorists, shows bicyclist safety significantly increases when there are more bikes on the road, a finding that could be attributed to a “safety in numbers” effect. The study focused on Boulder, which has one of the highest rates of bicycling in the country at [...]

Written by David Kelly • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

CU leads fifth class of Boettcher Investigators

bfww

Each early career scientist will receive a grant of $225,000 to further groundbreaking work that holds promise for improving human health.

Diet beverages shown to play positive role in dieters’ weight loss

Diet beverages shown to play positive role

A groundbreaking new study released this week by the CU Anschutz Health and Wellness Center confirms that drinking diet beverages helps people lose weight.

Written by Marcia Neville • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

New CU study illuminates how cancer-killing gene may actually work

Scientists armed with a supercomputer and a vast trove of newly collected data on the body’s most potent “tumor suppressor” gene have created the best map yet of how the gene works, an accomplishment that could lead to new techniques for fighting cancers, which are adept at disabling the gene in order to thrive. Scientists [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

Five questions for Allan Wallis

Wallis

Allan Wallis is an associate professor of public policy at the University of Colorado Denver’s School of Public Affairs. Previously he taught at CU-Boulder, where he directed the program in environmental design. He also has been a trainer in CU’s Excellence in Leadership Program since its inception.

Written by Cynthia Pasquale • Issue: • Campus: , • Tags:

CU-Boulder, Mesa County team up to make snow-depth data free to water managers, farmers, public

snow-depth data

A University of Colorado Boulder professor who developed a clever method to measure snow depth using GPS signals is collaborating with Western Slope officials to make the data freely available to a variety of users on a daily basis. CU-Boulder aerospace engineering sciences professor Kristine Larson and her colleagues discovered in 2009 that GPS signals [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

CU researcher helps Type 1 diabetics sleep better

CU researcher helps Type 1 diabetics sleep better

New research could soon make it easier for people with type 1 diabetes to get a safe night’s sleep. Very low blood-sugar levels can cause seizures or even, in rare cases, death. People with type 1 diabetes often sense warning signs of low blood sugar when they are awake, but not during sleep, explaining why [...]

Written by Jackie Brinkman • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

International team maps nearly 200,000 glaciers in quest of sea-level rise estimates

Pfeffer

An international team led by glaciologists from the University of Colorado Boulder and Trent University in Ontario, Canada, has completed the first mapping of virtually all of the world’s glaciers — including their locations and sizes — allowing for calculations of their volumes and ongoing contributions to global sea rise as the world warms. The [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

Rural microbes could boost city dwellers’ health, according to new paper involving CU-Boulder

Rural microbes could boost city dwellers’ health, according to new paper involving CU-Boulder

The greater prevalence of asthma, allergies and other chronic inflammatory disorders among people of lower socioeconomic status might be due in part to their reduced exposure to the microbes that thrive in rural environments, according to a new scientific paper co-authored by a University of Colorado Boulder researcher. The article, published in the journal Clinical [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

LITeS program trains innovative leaders

Innovation was the theme for the 2014 cohort of the Leadership for Innovative Team Science (LITeS) program. Participants shared their collaborative projects and were recognized for their achievements on April 18. Designed to hone leadership skills, the LITeS program is offered annually by the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CCTSI) to selected senior and emerging leaders [...]

Written by Andy Gilmore • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Research shows impact of Facebook unfriending

unfriend

Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend’ to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it. The studies, published earlier this year, show that the most likely person to be unfriended is a high school acquaintance. “The most common reason for [...]

Written by David Kelly • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Prof sees great future in (malleable) plastics

malleable plastics

Researchers at CU-Boulder have discovered a new kind of plastic that can be reshaped or recycled either by heating or soaking in water. Wei Zhang, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at CU-Boulder Wei Zhang, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, led an interdisciplinary team of researchers that published its findings in the journal Advanced [...]

Written by Clint Talbott • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Five questions for David Reed

Reed

The Boulder native has come full circle, returning to the university where, as a youngster, he once sold sodas at Folsom Field. The former cable TV exec now is a visiting scholar in residence at the Interdisciplinary Telecommunications Program.

Written by Cynthia Pasquale • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Q&A: Michel Chonchol

Q&A: Michel Chonchol

Since 2008, he has served as the Director of Clinical Research in the Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension. In 2012, he was promoted to professor and has served as Director of the End Stage Renal Disease program since 2013.

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: ,

Yoshinaga-Itano to be honored for research

Yoshinaga-Itano

Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, professor of audiology at CU-Boulder, will be honored by the Lake Drive Foundation for Children Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Mountain Lakes, N.J. , for her research, which sparked universal newborn hearing screenings and revolutionized the early intervention movement. According to the foundation, millions of newborns worldwide are screened for [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Matias receives national award for education research

people_matias_thumbnail

Cheryl Matias, an assistant professor in the School of Education and Human Development at CU Denver, has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the American Educational Research Association Division K Innovations in Research on Diversity in Teacher Education Award. The award recognizes research that demonstrates innovation in addressing issues of diversity in teaching and/or [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: , ,

Study on lunar crater counting shows crowdsourcing effective, accurate tool

Study on lunar crater counting shows crowdsourcing effective, accurate tool

If Galileo were still alive and kicking, he might want to take a selfie with some of the thousands of citizen scientists all around the world for their surprisingly accurate work of counting craters on the pock-marked moon. A new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder showed that as a group, volunteer counters [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags:

Greenwood authors study on outsourcing public services

Daphne T. Greenwood, professor in the Department of Economics and director of the Colorado Center for Policy Studies based at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, authored a groundbreaking study on the trend of state and local governments contracting public services to private corporations. The study, released March 11, says governments more often are choosing [...]

Written by Staff • Issue: • Campus: • Tags: